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The Wasulu people

 The Wasulu People are ethnic Fulani living in an areas of  West African that constitutes parts of  Côte dIvoire, Guinea, and Mali. 

They live in a region that expands from the southwest corner of Mali, to the northwest corner of Côte dIvoire, and the northeast part of Guinea.

The Wasulu settled among the Maninka (in the north eastern corner of Guinea and the southwestern corner of Mali). It is believed that they setted in Yanfolila and surrounding areas between the 11th and 14th centuries AD.  They eventually adopted the language and culture of the surrounding Maninka and Bambara. The Wasulu now speak the Bambara language with a mixture of Malinké which is called Wasalunkan. 

Many of the Wasulu are farmers, with cotton being their main crop. Islam was introduced among the Wasulu in the late 1800s.  Like their Fulani brethren, The Wasulu are almost 100% Muslim. 

Wasulu villages are often remote and some are inaccessible by car at the peak of the rainy season.  Like many West Africans, they live a simple lifestyle depending on locally grown crops to feed themselves.  Many people in the communities are farmers, with main crops being rice, peanuts, and corn, a staple in the Wasalun diet.  Cotton is also grown, primarily for export.

The Wasulu culture has a long and rich history of which music plays a key role.  The Wasulu music has become known internationally as Wass and is enjoyed by people of all ages.   The super star, internationally known singer Oumou Sangare is originally from the Wasulu group of Mali. Oumou Sangaré is the leading female star of the Wasulu sound, which is based on an ancient tradition of hunting rituals mixed with songs about devotion, praise, and harvest played with pentatonic (five-note) melodies. In addition to the flute and violin her sound is accompanied by the sound of the scraping kèrègnè, women play the flé, a calabash strung with cowrie shells, which they spin and throw into the air in time to the music. Sangaré most often sings about love and the importance of freedom of choice in marriage.